Frequently Asked Questions

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Tips and Tricks

Wanna become better at using the Lingofy tool? Check out these wonderful tips!

Getting started with the Personal Style Guide

The real power of Lingofy can be found in the Personal Style Guide. This is how you make Lingofy truly yours; with the words, phrases and names that you need Lingofy to flag and track as you write and edit.

Accessing your Personal Style Guide

You can get to the Personal Style guide in one of two ways:

From the Lingofy menu, choose Go to my dictionary.

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This will open the Personal Style Guide in a new browser window.

You can also type https://www.lingofy.com/lingofy into your browser’s Address Bar. We’d recommend bookmarking this for easy access.

Logging in

Log on to your Personal Style Guide.

Use the email address with which you signed up for Lingofy and the password that was provided in your Welcome email. (This is the same password you used after activating the extension to log in to Lingofy in your browser.) Hint: Click the checkbox next to “Remember me!” to tell the browser to remember your username and password.

Having logged in, you’ll be brought to the Welcome page.

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This is where you start adding the terms and information that will make Lingofy your own.

Adding entries

To add a new term to the Personal Style Guide, click Add New.

 

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Here’s where you provide Lingofy the guidance for how to handle the term when it appears in your copy.

Term: This is the word, phrase or name you want Lingofy to flag or acknowledge as correct.

Lingofy will determine whether the term is a “Word/Phrase,” “Proper Name” or “Abbreviation,” and will update the dropdown below the Term field accordingly. If you want to change the automatically selected value, you can do so.

The “Flag as warning” checkbox allows you to tell Lingofy to alert you whenever this term appears in your copy — even if it is spelled correctly. Read more about Warning Words here.

The “Set as favorite” checkbox allows you to add this term to your Favorites list. The Favorites list is a way to filter your Personal Style Guide to show the entries to which you most often refer.

Search for Incorrect Form: This is an optional field that allows you to tell Lingofy to search for a common misspelling. An example: One of our most frequent typos is “Forth Worth” when we mean to type “Fort Worth.” Don’t know why, but that extra “h” falls out of our keyboard nearly every time. This field tells Lingofy to look specifically for that term in our text.

Definition: This is one of the most important fields in the Personal Style Guide. Information entered in this field will be shown in the Info window in your Lingofy proofing session. Use this to remind you why you’ve entered a particular term your Personal Style Guide.

Notes: This is an extra field where you can make a note to yourself about a particular entry. This will only be visible in your Personal Style Guide.

Following are some examples of typical entries:

The common typo:

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The hated cliché, flagged as a Warning:

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Browsing your dictionary

Click Browse to see all the entries in your Personal Style Guide.

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Click on an individual entry to see more.

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As you hover your mouse over an entry, the Pencil and Star icons become visible. Click on the Pencil icon to edit or delete the chosen entry. Click on the Star icon to set that entry as a Favorite.

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Multi-edit

The Multi-edit button allows you to delete or edit multiple terms. This can be helpful, for instance, when you want to put the same Definition or Note on several terms in your Personal Style Guide.

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Click on the checkbox next to the entry or entries you want to select, then click the appropriate buttons to delete or edit.

Favorites

It won’t be long before your Personal Style Guide has a long list of terms. You can set terms to which you frequently refer as Favorites, which will make the list more manageable.

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Search

You can search through your list by typing the term into the Search bar at the top of the page. Lingofy will search as you type and update the list of results.

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Note that if you choose My Favorites and then enter a term into the Search bar, the results will include only those entries that are set as Favorites. Click Browse to search the full list of entries.

Edit Preferences

Click the Edit Preferences link to edit your preferences.

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You can choose the following:

Maximum number of entries per page: This allows you to define how many entries will be returned on a page when clicking Browse, My Favorites or searching.

Show definition in list of entries: Check this box to see the Definition field when you click Browse or My Favorites. Uncheck this box to show only the Term.

Number of characters shown for Definition: With the “Show definition” box checked, you can tell Lingofy how much of the definition you want to show. The minimum is 50 characters; the maximum to show is 300 characters. (Remember, a definition can be as many as 3,000 characters.)

Log out

Click the Log Out link to log out of Lingofy. You may also simply close your browser tab or window.

Accept suggestions, or not

Lingofy will not make changes in your text unless you explicitly instruct it to do so. Let’s look at this example text:

He was a patieint at John Hopkins University. He admitted that he almost never went there and that when visiting the lovely city of Bombay, he liked to watch shows on his iPhone. He was very proficient at yoyo tricks. State officials debated the need for sports programs in public schools. He knew weather patterns would be unpredictable, so he checked the forecast on his Ipad. He had little to say, but he did Tweet, as the two couples got along famously despite the fact that there was a perfect storm that would surely put their friendship to the test. Audience members were stunned by the sudden arrival of David Wentermann — they booed and chanted that he was a bonehead. Promoters for the event were unable to reach the front-man for the band on his cell phone. Prior to his death, he was very much alive … the chairperson was scheduled to speak at  5 PM.

Proofing this text with Lingofy generates the following suggestions. By default, the proofing window will appear with all of the suggestions unchecked.

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If you accept all of the suggestions, simply check the checkbox next to “All” at the top of the window.

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You can also choose which suggestions to apply by checking/unchecking the box next to the suggestion.

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With all of the suggestions checked, here is the revised text after clicking “Accept”:

He was a patient at Johns Hopkins University. He admitted that he seldom went there and that when visiting the lovely city of Mumbai, he liked to watch shows on his iPhone. He was very proficient at yo-yo tricks. State officials debated the need for sports programs in public schools. He knew weather patterns would be unpredictable, so he checked the forecast on his iPad. He had little to say, but he did tweet, as the two couples got along famously despite the fact that there was a perfect storm that would surely put their friendship to the test. Audience members were stunned by the sudden arrival of David Wentermann — they booed and chanted that he was a bonehead. Promoters for the event were unable to reach the frontman for the band on his cellphone. Before his death, he was very much alive … the chairman was scheduled to speak at 5 p.m.

You can also override one of Lingofy’s suggestions. Double-click on Lingofy’s suggestion and type your own in its place.

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Hit the Enter or Return key to apply your suggestion. Lingofy will check the box next to the suggestion automatically, and the source icon will change to indicate a user override.

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If you would prefer that all of Lingofy’s suggestions be checked by default, click on the Options button in the lower left corner of the Lingofy window.

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Choose “Initial Value of Checkboxes,” then choose “All Checked” from the flyout menu.

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Lingofy will not make changes in your text unless you explicitly instruct it to do so.

By default, the proofing window will appear with all of the suggestions unchecked.

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You can then choose which corrections to accept by checking the checkbox next to the suggestion. If you accept all of the suggestions, simply check the checkbox next to “All” at the top of the window.

Changing checkbox settings on Windows

You might prefer to have all of the checkboxes checked by default, and then uncheck the boxes next to the suggestions you don’t want to apply. On Windows, you can change this setting by clicking on the Lingofy menu and choosing Settings.

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Click on the Proofing tab.

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Under the setting labeled “Initial value of checkboxes,” click the dropdown and select All Checked.

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The next time you run Lingofy, you’ll see that all of the suggestions are checked.

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Changing checkbox settings on Mac

On Mac OS X, go the Lingofy menu and choose Settings.

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The Lingofy Settings window will appear. To change the default checkbox settings, click on the selector under “Initial value of checkboxes” and choose “All checked.”

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To reject one of Lingofy’s suggestions, simply uncheck the checkbox next to the suggestion.

To change a suggestion and apply a correction of your own, double-click on Lingofy’s suggestion in the proofing window to make the text editable, and type in your own correction. If you want to edit a Warning or an Unknown (in the example below, “a perfect storm”), double-click in the empty space next to the Warning or Unknown term and type your edit. The interface varies slightly between Windows and Mac OS X, as shown below:

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Adding words to your Personal Style Guide

In this post, we discussed how to navigate your web-based Personal Style Guide. You can also add words to your Personal Style Guide directly from a Lingofy proofing session.

If you use a particular proper name or other term that comes up frequently as an Unknown Term, simply click the “+” icon next to the item in the proofing window to add it to your Personal Style Guide.

An example: I write a lot of technical documentation, and I’ve made some determinations about how components of a user interface should be expressed. These styles might or might not be addressed by AP or Webster’s.

In this example, you’ll see that I’ve used “checkbox” as one word in my documentation. Because it’s not yet in my Personal Style Guide, and the built-in references are not familiar with the term, Lingofy is flagging it as an Unknown.

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By clicking the “+” icon to the right of the term, I can add it to my Personal Style Guide directly from the proofing session. The icon will update to a green checkmark as shown.

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With that term in my Personal Style Guide, Lingofy no longer flags it as an Unknown nor an error. Whenever I write “checkbox” as one word and proof my text, Lingofy will acknowledge that as correct.

When I browse my Personal Style Guide, the term appears in the list.

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I can edit that entry with additional information. In this case, I will add some information and will tell Lingofy to flag “check box” when I write it as two words.

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This ensures that I will be consistent when I write my technical documentation, but also will ensure that Lingofy will flag “check box” when I type it as two words. This gives me the option to uncheck that entry in a proofing session and keep “check box” as two words if I’m writing in a context where that usage is correct.

Your Personal Style Guide will take precedence over the built-in dictionary, the AP Stylebook and Webster’s New World College Dictionary when you run a proofing session.

Basic troubleshooting

Sometimes, things don’t work the way we think they should …

For answers to general troubleshooting questions, refer to our section “Having problems with Lingofy?”, which will detail solutions to common problems and questions you might encounter while using Lingofy. If you don’t find an answer to your specific question, please submit your concern via the Feedback link in your Personal Style Guide.

Phrases, not just words

The first thing you’ll notice when you check your spelling with Lingofy is that it’s not just catching spelling errors. It can also determine when you’ve used a correctly spelled word in the wrong place.

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Lingofy checks in blocks of up to 10 words at a time. This means that, out of the box, Lingofy will catch errors such as:

“John Hopkins University” (should be “Johns Hopkins University”)

“Extra sensory perception” (should be “extrasensory perception,” two words)

In your Personal Style Guide, you can add phrases that your spellchecker misses. An example:  “Forth Worth” instead of typing “Fort Worth,” the city in Texas. Typical spellcheckers look right over such an error, because both “Forth” and “Worth” are correctly spelled. Lingofy can catch “Forth Worth”  as well as any number of common errors plagued by even the most cautious writers and editors.

The “i” icon next to the reference source icon in the Results Window indicates that extra information is available. If the suggestion is from the AP Stylebook or Webster’s, you’ll see information from the reference source. If the entry is from your Personal Style Guide, you’ll see the reference information you entered. This can be helpful to remind you why you asked Lingofy to flag this particular term.

Warning words

Where other spellcheckers simply find misspelled words, Lingofy goes a step further with the concept of “Warning Words”. These are words that may be correctly spelled in your document, but that you should think twice about using.

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Lingofy can also flag potentially embarrassing typos. You know you meant to type “public,” but that “l” fell off the page somewhere along the way. Lingofy is watching for this one.

Examples of warning words and phrases in the built-in Lingofy style guides include:

Common profanities

Clichés and clumsy constructions the AP Stylebook suggests you avoid

Terms that might be ethnically offensive

In the example at left, you’ll note the instance where that pesky “l” in “public” failed to appear. You also see a couple of words flagged by the AP Stylebook: “alleged” and “arrested.” Both of those words may be correct, but the AP Stylebook advises using them with caution.

If the words are correct as used, you need do nothing; click Accept and move on. If you want to restore that missing “l” from the Results Window, you may do so by clicking to the right of the word “pubic” and adding the “l” to the incorrect spelling.

You may add your own warning words and phrases to your Personal Style Guide. For instance, if you write about politics, you know that seemingly innocuous phrases might inflame some readers. Add these phrases to your Personal Style Guide and Lingofy will give you one more chance to rewrite those before you click “Publish.”

Specialty terms

Every industry, hobby and activity has its own language. Typical spellcheckers handle this unique lingo in one of two ways:

• By flagging these peculiar terms as errors, which makes spellchecking far less useful

• By ignoring these terms entirely because it knows nothing about them

Your Personal Style Guide in Lingofy solves both of these problems.

For example, let’s say you blog about cars. Car names are often spelled in ways ranging from the quirky (the Kia Cee’d) to the downright incorrect (Galaxie 500.) Thankfully you can enter such items into your Personal Style Guide.

Because you can teach Lingofy phrases as well as words, it knows that the “Ford Galaxie 500” is spelled one way, and the “Milky Way Galaxy” is spelled another. It can even flag “Galaxy 500” as being incorrect.

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A galaxy, created billions of years ago.

If you write about photography, you might have a personal preference regarding the style for f-stop. Is it F-stop? f-stop? F-Stop? The standard references don’t weigh in on this, but you can decide for yourself by entering your preference in your Personal Style Guide. This allows Lingofy to enforce consistency in your writing.

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A Ford Galaxie 500, created in 1967.

If the publications for which you write deviate from AP style or Webster’s on certain terms, you can make those entries in your Personal Style Guide, which saves the editor on the other end from having to change them. Consistency and accuracy is one of the best ways to keep the assignments coming in.

Proper names

Is the “B” capitalized in “LeBron James?”(*) For any writer, getting a name wrong is a cardinal sin. Dealing with proper names can cause considerable frustration when you’re spellchecking. Either you’re dealing with a string of characters that your spellchecker thinks is an error, or you match the wrong spelling of a first name with the correct spelling of a last name.

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The dictionaries built into Lingofy are compiled from some of the world’s leading news sources, so it knows the names of major historical figures and newsmakers. With your Personal Style Guide, you can teach it the names of people about whom you write often.

If Lingofy doesn’t know the person about whom you’re writing, you can introduce him or her. Simply click on the “Add to dictionary” button in the Lingofy proofing window. The name will be entered into your Personal Style Guide.

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You can also enter street names, place names, venues and other proper nouns that are pertinent to your area. If you’re in Greenville, S.C., for instance, you can use Lingofy to ensure that you never have to worry again about whether “Bi-Lo Center” takes a hyphen or not. You never have to worry about it popping up in your spellchecker as an error when you actually have it right.

(* answer: Yes.)

Having problems with Lingofy?

If you can’t find an answer to your issue below, please email us at: support@lingofy.com
Lingofy requires an Internet connection. If you are having trouble accessing Lingofy, your first step should be to ensure your Internet connection is working.
If you have verified that you are not having issues with the Internet (and if you’re reading this page, chances are excellent that you’re not), then read on for some possibilities:

Lingofy not installing in Google Chrome

“I don’t see the Lingofy menu even though the installer said it successfully installed.”

Windows applications have a funny way of staying “open” even though you closed them… to solve this issues, try this:

  1.  Close all Office applications and browsers.
  1. Open Task Manager by right-clicking the Task Bar at the bottom of the screen and selecting “Task Manager”
  1. Terminate any of the following processes if they are running:
  • EXE
  • exe
  • exe
  1. Uninstall Lingofy by going to “Control Panel” then “Programs and Features” (or “Add & Remove Programs” in Windows XP) and select and uninstall every item starting with “Lingofy”.
  1. Download and run the Lingofy installer: https://web.lingofy.com/Download/Lingofy.exe.
  1. Restart the machine if prompted to do so

Connection to Lingofy Server

“I don’t see the Lingofy menu; all i see is ‘Connect to Lingofy Server.’”

No problem; select that.

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You should then get a message verifying a successful connection to the Lingofy server.

On a really bad day, you might get a message saying that you cannot connect.

If you’re working from a place of business on a corporate network, this could indicate that Lingofy is being blocked by a corporate firewall or antivirus software. It is also important to note that the installation instructions assume that you have full administrative rights to the computer on which you are working. If connection problems ensue while you’re working on a corporate network, consult your systems administrator.

In rare instances, it could indicate a problem with the Lingofy server itself. Click here to test your connection to the Lingofy server. If you do not see the “Connection successful” page, try restarting your computer and re-attempt connecting to Lingofy. If it doesn’t, there is a possibility that the Lingofy server is temporarily out of service.

I don't see the Lingofy menu in Google Chrome

Are you in Incognito Mode? By default, Google Chrome disables extensions in Incognito Mode. If you want to use Lingofy in Incognito Mode, go to the Tools menu -> Settings and choose Extensions

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Is the Lingofy extension disabled? If the extension was disabled somewhere along the way, click Enable on the Extensions page to re-enable Lingofy.

Is the Lingofy extension disabled in Mozilla Firefox?

If the extension was disabled somewhere along the way, click Enable on the Extensions page to re-enable Lingofy.

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Is the extension disabled? If the extension was disabled somewhere along the way, click Add-Ons under the Firefox menu to re-enable Lingofy.